The problem of protein; or, why I want to 'save' food for pleasure

More recently, something interesting began to happen. The line of questioning that starts with ‘why do you do it?’ began to be followed by inquiries about whether I consume any protein shakes/powders/milks. Not my daily caloric intake. Not how much or which type of carbs I tend to eat. Not if all this is possible if I were vegan or vegetarian. Not if I do intermittent fasting. It is increasingly, ‘do you use any protein shakes/powders/milks?’. In this piece, I will explain how my rejection of the protein powders/shakes/milks is an attempt to retain food clearly and squarely within the realm of pleasures.

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A Search for Authenticity: Uliassi and Casa Marcial

How can one justify talking about these two seemingly very different restaurants in the same article? Uliassi is a Michelin three-star seafood restaurant on the Adriatic coast of Italy and Casa Marcial hails from the countryside of Asturias in Northern Spain. It is very likely that chef Mauro of Uliassi and Nacho Manzano of Casa Marcial have never dined in each other’s restaurant, and they may have never met. So imitation is out of question, and inspiration is highly unlikely. But they are united in a deeper sense.

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Joie de Vivre - A History of Istanbul Meyhanes

Before La Belle Époque was ushered in during the late 19th century, Istanbul was one of the most alluring “metropolitan” cities of the world. Situated at the western end of the Silk Road and buzzing with energy thanks to its diversified complexion, harboring a variety of cultures ranging from the Eurasian to the Mediterranean, being a port city bringing together two continents further added to Istanbul’s charm. Such dynamic splendor was bolstered, among other things, by a drinking culture that was built upon notions of camaradarie and jouissance. Drinking at the taverns lining up the streets of Galata, sailors, wanderers, men of letters, vagrants, singers, and all other sorts of Istanbulites recreated this city’s colorful harmony day after day… And, as brilliantly shown by the doyen Reșad Ekrem Koçu, the only way to unearth the real Istanbul is by attending to their stories…   

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D’Berto — A Galician Seafood Temple

After a combined seven recent meals at D’Berto in O Grove, Vedat Milor and Brandon Granier feel confident in their assertion that the restaurant is a temple for those who seek the western world’s best seafood. In addition to sourcing some of the finest shellfish and crustaceans from the geographical fount that is O Grove, sister-brother duo Marisol Berto’s a la plancha grilling and frying and Alberto’s warm hospitality make this a destination restaurant for the cigalas, zamburinas negras, spider crab with innard sauce and fried lobster, among others.

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Kawamura: Beyond Great Steak, the Peak of Yoshoku in Tokyo

In addition to well-known examples such as tempura, yōshoku is a self-reflexive optic of a Japanese observing himself cooking Western dishes. I have thus far had only mild interest in Western-influenced restaurants in Japan, until I visited a few ingredient-driven temples over the past 12 months: Kawamura, the 7-seat counter restaurant specializing in wagyu and abalone; Comptoir Feu, a creative kappo restaurant in Osaka; and CHIUnE, which references other cuisines such as Piemonte for its consommé and China for its sublime shaoxing ice cream. Technically, the latter two restaurants are not yōshoku per se, as they do not rehearse the staples of the repertoire (hamburg steak, curry rice, et al.), whereas Kawamura san mainly cooks within these parameters. Normally yōshoku as a genre does not prioritize the ingredient foremost but rather the established codes of the dish. Kawamura is thus an exception in sourcing premium ingredients for the familiar repertoire. Gastroville former contributor Mikael Jonnson was among the first to expose the qualities of Kawamura’s wagyu to the anglophone world. It bears adding to Mikael’s account that Kawamura is probably the highest elevation of a yōshoku restaurant.

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Thoughts on New German Cuisine and a recent dinner Werneckhof by Geisel

The high-end cuisine in most of the German speaking parts of Europe very often lacks a unique flair and identity. This is a bold statement to make and a harsh analysis, too. Having lived in the German speaking hemisphere since my birth, I’ve eaten at many gastronomic restaurants, few were able to deliver excellence. A recent meal at Werneckhof by Geisel in Munich, where the superbly talented Tohru Nakamura, who trained at the three-starred restaurants Oud Sluis, Ishikawa in Tokyo and Vendôme, is in charge of the kitchen, showed great potential.

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Sergey GURZIJEVComment
The Michelin/Visit California Guide Rush

With pronouncements vouching for Michelin’s “unrivaled integrity, independence, and expertise”, the Director of Visit California was apparently unaware of, wasn’t in a position to know about, or chose to ignore, events in Michelin’s recent history that created the transformation of the Michelin Guides from an unbiased source of rectitude, inscrutability, deliberateness, and discretion to one that has refashioned itself in the digital age by engaging in commercial ventures and activities as the sales of its guidebooks have fallen.

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One Part Genius To One Part Hype: Nouvelle Cuisine Française Clarified

The term “Nouvelle Cuisine” is not as new as one might think. Marin codified 18th-century French cuisine, while Menon (pseudonym) vulgarized it, but in return helped to create a broader base. Generations of cooks learned from no less than 200 years ago by studying the “Cuisinière Bourgeoise”, first published in 1746.  Both chefs, Marin and Menon, created a founding legend of cooking styles with the catchy formula “Nouvelle Cuisine”, which subsequent generations of chefs would use to promote and market their own style. Throughout the centuries, cookbook authors have judged the “old cooking” of their direct predecessors as “gothic,” “complicated,” and “heavy.” 

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Gastromondiale's Madeleines of 2018

At Gastromondiale, we are moved by dishes that entice our senses and only subsequently instigate us to consider the technical or semiotic dimensions of a dish. The organoleptic aspects may provoke comparisons. One tastes the rey fish at Güeyu Mar and the variegated textures also encountered in wagyu are superseded by a depth of flavor more profound than any beef. The historical relevance of a dish can equally follow suit. Alain Passard’s vegetable pasta transports the diner to an alternate history of Roma, where the spaghetti carbonara might have benefited from the minerality of potatoes. Suffice it to say, both dishes send one uncontrollably on a path of rumination. In their initial, visceral appeal, they resemble madeleines. It is in this spirit that we appropriate the Proustian icon to denote three privileged moments from the dining year 2018.

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The Poet of the Palate: An Appreciation, Appraisal and Analysis of the Writings of Jonathan Gold

On the continuum of critical writings, restaurant reviews fall somewhere between the Venice Biennale and the toaster ovens in Consumer Reports. When the restaurant culture began to take off in the 1960’s, the review media barely existed, but with the expansion of the restaurant business, reviewing grew likewise. Despite the inevitable hacks and the legions of bloggers with their cellphone photos, restaurant reviewing can be a legitimate form of journalism, and it has had some who are enjoyable to read beyond a review’s sell-by date. Also there is at least one master whose writings could conceivably remain immortal as the Annales school of historians that studies accounts of every day life will be having a field day with his output. That is Pulitzer Prize-winning restaurant critic Jonathan Gold who showed how much the form has evolved since The New York Times’  Craig Claiborne began in 1962 writing short, perfunctory descriptions and soon after giving one-to-three stars to New York City restaurants.

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Tributes to Bernard Pacaud, Part II: The Last of the Mohicans

Inconceivable these days, Bernard Pacaud began his apprenticeship with the Lyons culinary legend La Mère Brazier when he only 15 years old. Her demands on the quality of ingredients of all kinds defined Pacaud’s cooking philosophy very early: “Only use the best. The guests end up paying for it”, he says.  Pacaud also does not pose for front pages and rarely appears on television. “I’m just interested in doing my job as well as possible,” he says. But Bernard Pacaud is disillusioned: “Just look at what has become of gastronomy!”

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Tributes to Bernard Pacaud, Part I: The Silence of the L’Ambroisie

In terms of experiencing this Age d’Or de la Gastronomie, which is what we think every aspiring gastronome who already hasn’t should, there are luxury hotel restaurants to go to where you can be surrounded by opulence with formality dating back to the late 19th-century such as L’Epicure, the main dining salon in the Hotel Bristol or the Alain Ducasse Restaurant Le Louis XV in the Hotel de Paris in Monaco, where the cuisine and service hark somewhat back to this Golden Age. Yet in our estimation, no restaurant quite captures the undistilled essence of fine dining in France of the last 30 years of the 20th-century than L’Ambroisie.

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Le Clarence: The Return of French Fine Dining?

Because the globe-trotting “influencers” have been paid to promote restaurants that are sponsored by business conglomerates, the overall result has been the decline of true fine-end destinations, in general, and “la grande cuisine francaise,” in particular. But “la grande cuisine francaise” is not yet gone. How else can one explain the sudden arrival of Le Clarence onto the dining scene in Paris?

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Niko Romito’s Reale: A Puzzling Experience

I went to Chef Romito’s Reale with the highest expectations and left somehow puzzled. I was puzzled because there was a discrepancy between what I had expected and what I found. I expected purity and intensity in a myriad of deceptively simple but complex preparations. I found interesting cooking, excellent broths, uneven dishes, technically good, but sometimes imprecise dishes. Some courses were excellent, while others were bland, bordering on ordinary. I got the impression that the cuisine is geared more to impress other chefs than to give pure pleasure and satisfaction.

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Vedat MILORComment
Chef Guy Gateau Recalls Joël Robuchon

It is no wonder that I revere Guy Gateau. In a remarkable twist of fate or coincidence he prepared the cuisine at both my all-time favorite bistro and formal restaurant: Le Petit Coin de la Bourse in the Paris IVth and Restaurant Alain Chapel in the outskirts of Lyon. About 15 years ago, I tracked Guy down when I was doing some research into Alain Chapel after I saw Guy's name in a photo caption in the magnificent and detailed book from 1978 “Great Chefs of France”. We have had several get-togethers and have always kept in touch. Guy has now written this personal tribute to Joël Robuchon which I share here.

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Japan Journey Journal, Part Two: Restaurant Yanagiya, A Revered Country Cuisine Sketched In Charcoal

Japan has more than its share of difficult-to-book restaurants, particularly some of the sushi and kaiseki ones in Tokyo. In planning his recent trip to Japan, a provincial restaurant named Yanagiya caught Robert Brown’s eye because of its sky-high score on Tabelog, the Japanese restaurant-goer’s rating site. That it also was the only one of its breed–an irori restaurant, an old, traditional but dying class of grilling-over-charcoal cuisine–among the elite Tabelog restaurants really stirred his juices.

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Japan Journey Journal, Part One: Tokyo Dining, Particularly Sushi, Overall

What France in the 1980s was and what Spain continues to be since the early 2000s is what Japan is today—a pre-eminent “go to” country for the inveterate gastronomic traveler. The entire country, however, is blessed for its rich and varied produce, too rich and varied to go into here. What you notice in watching the chaotic, unsightly, unplanned scene rolling past your Shinkansen window is that thrown in with the five-to-ten story apartment blocks; the landless single-family houses with brown tile roofs and a car port; the pachinko parlors and small industrial “ateliers” are small plots of land on which grow rice, vegetables or other produce. It’s no wonder, then, that the Japanese have a gastronomic landscape in the most far-reaching sense of the term.

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Epicure – Harmony, Products and Precision

Neo-nouvelle cuisine is what can be seen as the logical progression of nouvelle cuisine, it is what some might call classical French with a contemporary twist or the adaption of technical progression and contemporary trends into French cuisine. Frothed sauces, micro-herbs, acidity, Asian products, sous-vide cooking or gels are some of the cornerstones of what makes it necessary for me to differentiate this certain style from classical Nouvelle cuisine. Neo-nouvelle cuisine is a logical continuity, something one could possibly call a “conservative revolution” of French cuisine. One of the representatives of this approach, admittedly in a rather conservative way, is Éric Fréchon, chef éxécutif at Epicure in Paris.

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